Monday, August 18, 2014

Standing in the middle, not knowing what's coming next...

The best way of describing what is coming next for LGBTQ concerns/issues may be by describing what I once heard an ethicist observe in the middle of change: you don't know where you are in terms of the progress you've made, because you are standing in the middle of the change itself, without a read on where you've been necessarily, and not knowing necessarily what is the next step, or what is just over the horizon.  You are simply in the middle of it all, trying to figure it out, day by day, hoping that you are making progress, but never really knowing.

I am "there" with the ethicist, not knowing if I'm making progress or not in terms of LGBTQ issues re: parenting, marriage, and job discrimination. I am striving to go forward, but it is daily questioning and wondering and discerning where we've been, where we are, and where we are headed.

It is a pilgrimage.



Saturday, August 9, 2014

At the intersection of love and justice with Moral March and Equality NC.

I like intersection/intersectionality.

So I saw it "happen"--almost--when the Moral Monday March to the Polls and Equality NC celebrated the Fourth Circuit Court decision in Durham recently.


From the article:

Last month, I stood on the edge of a large crowd listening to the Rev. William Barber at the Moral March to the Polls rally, gathered at the CCB Plaza in downtown Durham. Even though parking was not convenient, a large throng had gathered together that late afternoon to renounce “VIVA” – North Carolina’s Voter Information Verification Act – and the other parts of HB 589 passed last year by the N.C. General Assembly.
Young and old, black and white, gay and straight, women and men, religious folks and nonreligious folks alike gathered as North Carolinians to say that the new laws crafted by state Republicans would suppress the vote from among the African-American and Hispanic-American community, the elderly and people living with disabilities, a Democratic voting constituency.

As the Moral March rally was drawing to a close, a crowd assembled down the street from the CCB Plaza at the nightspot Motorco. They were celebrating the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal’s ruling that Virginia’s (and essentially North Carolina’s) constitutional amendment outlawing marriage equality by stating that marriage is solely between one man and one woman was unconstitutional under the 14th Amendment.
Many of us were veterans from the Amendment 1 struggle and couldn’t believe what we were hearing: After spending countless hours and millions of dollars, after canvassing the state with walks and talks, after creating radio ads and television commercials, this law that many had pointed to as hateful fell apart after two years and two months. But then again, the reason it fell apart was because of the power of love.

Read more here:


Read more here: